A Sad Accident

The neighborhood near New Garden schoolhouse was considerably excited over the finding of the body of Jacob J. Spohn, an old man nearly sixty years of age. He was found drowned in Marrowbone Creek, on Tuesday, June 14, 1870. He had attended to his duties in the morning, and, after eating a light breakfast, took his fishing pole and started for Marrowbone Creek. Not returning to dinner, his family became somewhat alarmed and went in search of him. They found his body floating in the water about a foot below the surface, life apparently having been extinct some hours. His fishing pole was found where he had been fishing. It is supposed that, being subject to fainting spells, he had been attacked by one of them while sitting on the bank, and had fallen forward into the creek. The coroner’s verdict was: “Manner and cause of drowning to jurors unknown.” The fainting was believed to have been the true cause.

Another

Nearly seven years later, and in the same month, another sad accident happened, and the waters of Marrowbone Creek again proved the winding sheet of another unfortunate. William Reed, while attempting to cross Marrowbone Creek, believing he could ford it, drove in and the team soon found itself beyond its depth. In the struggle to get out, Mr. Reed in trying to help them, it is supposed, fell into the creek and was drowned. The team also shared the fate of the unfortunate owner. A coroner’s jury was impaneled by Squire J. G. Black, who acted as coroner, and the above was the conclusion arrived at. There was no witness to the sad affair, and the manner of their death could only be judged by the appearance of the victims.

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