August 17, 1871, the new station on the Chicago & Southwestern Railroad, half way between Gallatin on the northeast and Cameron on the southwest was given for a short time the name of Crofton. This elevated and undulating prairie was said to be the highest point of land in the county and was owned by Mrs. Susan Ethington, Frederick Croft, Jacob Fleisher and Henry Koons. The owners donated a large portion of the town site to the railroad company, both for railroad and town purposes. The railroad company in turn conveyed to a few persons interested, at Gallatin, who formed what was known at that time as the “Gallatin Company.” They pushed the sale of the lots and the town, under their charge, began to grow, and was called “Winston.” In February, 1872, a post-office was established at Winston and F. B. H. Brown was the first regularly appointed postmaster, receiving his commission at the time above mentioned. The first railroad station agent was T. J. Jefferies, who held the position for five-years, and who is recognized as one of the leading spirits of the town. Joseph Swike opened the first store in November, 1871, dealing in general merchandise. Henry Koons hung out a sign at his log cabin that he could entertain both man and beast in the highest style of the art. It did not have a very prepossessing look on the outside, but Mr. Koons knew how to “feed,” and could give his customers a good bed. His was the first hotel. Dr. Wilson hung out his shingle, but the balmy breezes which blow on the heights of Winston were not suggestive of a fortune. This town is a graveyard to a physician’s hope of wealth, but a drug store has been known to flourish if it had among its medicines the “elixir of life,” done up in, glass cases and in liquid form.

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