Biography of R. N. Killingsworth

R. N. Killingsworth, who resides in North Township, nine miles northwest of county seat, and who is one of the prominent agriculturists and stock-raisers of Dade County, is a native of Greene County, Mo., born January 12, 1840, and is the son of Joseph and Melinda (Barnett) Killingsworth. Joseph Killingsworth was born in McMinn County, E. Tenn., May 12, 1813, and died October 16, 1888, in Dade County, Mo. He was of Scotch descent. In 1838 he came to Greene County, Mo., followed agricultural pursuits, and was one of the early settlers of that county. His wife was born in Tennessee, in 1817, and died October 6, 1886. They were the parents of twelve children, eleven of whom grew to maturity, and nine now living. R. N. Killingsworth is the second child born to his parents. He remained at home until twenty-one years of age, and in July 1861, enlisted in the Federal Army, in Company D, Sixth Missouri Cavalry, and served six months. In 1863 he married Miss Martha P. Martin, who was born in Tennessee in 1843, and who is the daughter of Isaac and Margaret Martin. Mr. Martin came to Missouri about 1850, and is yet living. Mrs. Martin died about 1855. Nine children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Killingsworth: Lewis R., Della and Dora (twins), Berry, Halla N., William, Burton L., Leslie and Lois B. Mr. Killingsworth has resided on the farm he now owns since 1880; he has 120 acres in the home farm, eighty acres in another, and forty in still another tract. He is a Democrat in his political views, and he and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. His grandfather, Reuben Killingsworth, was born in Tennessee about 1788, was a soldier in the War of 1812, and died in Greene County, Mo., about 1857. His wife, Anna (McClain) Killingsworth, died in Greene County, Mo., about 1862.

Source:

Goodspeed, History of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade and Barton Counties, Missouri; Chicago, The Goodspeed publishing co., 1889.

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